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7 Major Skincare Tips from a Dermatologist

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7 Major Skincare Tips from a Dermatologist

May 6, 2021

Because of the beauty of Clubhouse, I was able to connect with Dr. Adeline who is a phenomenal dermatologist. She is not only so well spoken but so willing to share information with the internet. You're in for a serious skincare crash course now.

Skincare Trends to (Avoid)

Spot application of sunscreen is a trend she has seen lately (I wasn't even aware people did this!) It is quite literally placing sunscreen on spots (freckles, dark spots, acne, etc.) Do not do this because it is silly to just put sunscreen on specific spots on the face, as sunscreen needs to be applied all over the face to prevent more spots coming to the surface. A lot of those spots are sun damage, so to prevent more and protect existing, make sure you always have sunscreen on.

Recently there has been a lot of talk about dry brushing, and the word on the street is that it's going to remove toxins from the body. This application doesn't have anything to do with toxins inside the body, because dry brushing is a mechanical exfoliation on the outside. She specifies there is a lot of confusion about this piece, but dry brushing doesn't have the same function with the body as a massage does (for example). It's also quite abrasive on the skin.

When it comes to Gua Sha, and jade rollers, there's a lot of claims about what could be possible with the ongoing massage and usage of these tools. While they will help stimulate collagen and improve circulation, there is more of a soft tissue massage and may not be able to reduce many toxins unless you are doing a much more intense motion.

4 Products to Use for Newbies to Skincare

As you get into skincare, Dr. Adeline recommends having a good cleanser. If you can, doubling down and getting an exfoliating cleanser is a great option to help remove the dead skin so when you apply your products they're going on fresh skin.

Nourishing your skin (to be plump, healthy) means you want to put in glycerin, hyaluronic acid, and lots of ceramides to really give it real hydration.

When it comes to issues (hyperpigmentation, dark spots, etc) a vitamin C is going to prevent free radical damage of the collagen. Free radicals, like smoking, really break the skin down so you have to make sure lifestyle wise that you're not just adding skincare but you also need to be balanced.

Sunscreen helps prevent that free radical damage, and this is the biggest thing when it comes to preventing aging. Avoiding too much exposure to the sun (20-30 minutes a day is good for vitamin D but long-term exposure can be harmful on the regular.) Always wear SPF, even if you don't think you're going to be outside for long. The car ride, walking in and out of buildings, etc can all cause damage.

Finally a quality topical retinoid is good to start in your mid 20s. In order to be more proactive with the skin, try to incorporate more reparative items like retinoids to help with preventing the aging if and when you can. 

With the moisture and hydration boost, along with vitamin C and sunscreen, you're in a good place. Those are key for good skin (and keeping the routine simple) but also adding in a good topical retinoid is great for being ultra proactive. 

Trends & Dermatologist Recommended Products

Bakuchiol is a great alternative for retinol, as it is a plant alternative to retinoids. The benefit of it is that it doesn't give the same irritation. If pregnant or breast feeding, bakuchiol is a great route. Dr. Adeline loves the Ole Henriksen Bakuchiol Wrinkle Blur Eye Gel Cream. Pro tip: always use your pinky finger and don't tug too hard on that under eye area.

With moisture sandwiching, she recommends spraying the skin with the La Roche Posay Thermal Water or the Avene Thermal Water before beginning your skincare routine. Applying too much spray could have an adverse effect to some of the products, so there doesn't seem to be a benefit to overdoing the hydrating mists.

Lots of people are also doing a bit of slugging, which is the process of putting a lot of petroleum jelly on the face overnight. This petroleum could form a nice barrier overnight, but you must wash the face in the morning. The petroleum will block your skin and everything coming in or trying to come out, so you definitely have to cleanse off a bit feverishly in the morning. 

Dr. Adeline mentioned the Mielle Cleansing Jelly, and then Farmacy Cleansing Balm. For acne prone skin, look for salicylic acid cleanser or a glycolic acid cleanse like the one from Exuviance.

Aveeno, Bioderma, and La Roche Posay are a few brands she recommends and uses consistently. She's also been enjoying Exuviance for hyperpigmentation (or aggressively target anti-aging.) She likes their glycolic acid cleanser, which is a non acid exfoliant which adds moisture to the skin. They also have some at home retinol peel pads. She also loves Biopelle (cheaper than Skinceuticals but equally as strong). They have a strong vitamin C, so I will have to add this into my cart. If you have sensitive skin, Bioderma has a nice moisturizer for those with Rosacea. She loves La Roche Posay for the body, and really mentions that we don't want to forget the body when it comes to the skincare. 

"Clean Beauty" Versus Chemical

There's not a great standard when it comes to "clean beauty" because every brand decides how clean they are, and specifically companies like Sephora have a clean standard but that's not regulated. She made me laugh out loud when she said poison ivy is as natural as it gets, and it is not good for you. 

Even clean products utilize chemicals which is great perspective. Her overall explanation is that you can control the parameters of specific ingredients when they are formulated in the lab, which means chemicals can be used in a more effective manner versus plant based products which you cannot necessarily control.

For hyperpigmentation and acne prone skin, cleanser with salicylic acid or Benzoyl peroxide. PanOxyl with Benzoyl peroxide is going to be your best friends. It comes in various strengths so depending on your tolerance and how intense the acne is, you can decide on the strength. For body acne, there's a Neutrogena Body Clay with salicylic acid. For something stronger (melasma or hyperpigmentation) she recommends 10% glycolic cleanser. 

When it comes to sun damaged skin, a few products to help would be antioxidants, hyaluronic, sunscreen with antioxidants, ceramides, and topical retinoids (to start building the new reserves.)

How to (and how NOT to) Mix Serums

Retinols and vitamin C shouldn't be mixed together. Dr Adeline recommends that if the product comes with vitamin C and retinol come together, then it makes sense. Exuviance makes vitamin C and retinol in a capsule format. When we're doing this on our own and mixing products together, you should avoid mixing these two. You can do vitamin C in the AM and retinol in the PM.

Single ingredient products (hyaluronic, niacinamide, squalane, etc) have become a trend. Having products with separate ingredients is really forcing you to become a chemist in your bathroom. 

Niacinamide and hyaluronic can be combined. Hyaluronic is easily combined with a lot of other ingredients.

She doesn't prefer to mix AHAs and BHAs with retinol acid. She also separates the acids with the retinols because it's a lot of acidic products.

How to (and how NOT to) Mix Serums

Retinols and vitamin C shouldn't be mixed together. Dr Adeline recommends that if the product comes with vitamin C and retinol come together, then it makes sense. Exuviance makes vitamin C and retinol in a capsule format. When we're doing this on our own and mixing products together, you should avoid mixing these two. You can do vitamin C in the AM and retinol in the PM.

Single ingredient products (hyaluronic, niacinamide, squalane, etc) have become a trend. Having products with separate ingredients is really forcing you to become a chemist in your bathroom. 

Niacinamide and hyaluronic can be combined. Hyaluronic is easily combined with a lot of other ingredients.

She doesn't prefer to mix AHAs and BHAs with retinol acid. She also separates the acids with the retinols because it's a lot of acidic products.

When it comes to prescription strength versus drugstore, Dr Adeline distinguishes between the long-term end goal. If you want something more mild, then you would opt to go for the drugstore route.

When it comes to retinol over the counter, there is a progression. If you have Rosacea, she will start you with retinol esters which are the least irritating. They're much more tolerance but this will take you forever to see improvement in the skin texture. If you don't have Rosacea, then she would push you up to a retinol. Retinaldehyde is the strongest before Retinoic acid
(the acid can only be prescribed by a dermatologist.)

That was so much information all in one IGTV session with Dr. Adeline. If you have more questions, please let me know in the comments or DM me on Instagram and we'll get her back on so she can help us all get our best skin

What's the most valuable thing you learned here?

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Comments

LOVED this! The clean beauty thing is really interesting! And I guess the vitamin C for day and retinol for night thing has always been pretty obvious to me but I also have more experience with it so I can see how people would mix those two trying to create a super anti-aging serum lol!

Lizzie
http://www.lizzieinlace.com

I found the section of how to and how not to mix serums helpful! I am always learning from you and the people you have on your lives! You are so knowledgeable!!

really informative post! I have recently been using a plant based retinol and absolutely love it! I’m team clean beauty all the way but did enjoy reading her thoughts on it.

xo Laura Leigh
https://louellareese.com